How to clean your leather boots

There are two items in my wardrobe I’ll guiltlessly proclaim I never have enough of: coats and boots.

I live in Washington state, and half the year is spent in both, unless you want to be particularly cold and wet. A good pair of boots can take you far, and I’m seeing more and more solid footwear which is great! However, something a little heftier than what people are used to takes more care. I’m a firm believer that a garment is only worth the care you put into it. You could buy the best quality boots, for hundreds or even thousands of dollars, but that price tag and lasting reputation doesn’t equate some kind of magic that keeps them healthy without proper care.

Besides the following photos that guide you in cleaning and conditioning, here’s a few things you can do for your leather boots and shoes to keep them at their best:

-don’t wear the same pair two full days in a row. Leather needs to breathe, and it’s also beneficial for your feet, (unless you’re guided by a pediatrician to wear something specific every day). Of course I’m guilty of breaking this rule, everyone is, so for those times absoloutly do the following:

-have an open spot for your frequently worn footwear to rest, in a well ventilated area. Set them on the floor or on an open shelf after you take them off, keeping them out of the closet for 24 or more hours. This allows them to breathe, and keeps your closet from smelling like stuffy boots.

-NEVER place your leather boots or shoes near a heat source. Heaters, blow dryers, and fireplaces will dry out the leather and cause it to split and crack. To help speed up drying, remove laces, and remove any insoles placed inside.

-regularly use a soft and coarse bristle brush to remove dust, dirt, and other debris. I keep both by the front door, using the soft brush on the upper, and the coarse on the outsole.

-if you get mud on your boots or shoes, allow it to dry completely, then brush it off. Removing excessive mud when it’s wet can just work it into the leather and cause future damage.

The following care guide is for oil tanned top grain leather, and can be applied to similar boots and shoes, but please proceed with caution on your own footwear. Not all shoes and boots are made of the same leather and conditioning can alter the color. Some softer more supple leathers on designer and trendier footwear may need a light moisturizer, a waxy conditioner being too heavy. Otherwise, it’s really very easy, and will keep your boots healthy all season long for years to come ✨

Boots – Custom made packers by Whites Boots ordered via Animal Traffic

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s